Tag Archives: Hiking

What to Pack for Hiking in Peru

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With its varied terrain and altitude, Peru can be very difficult to pack for, particularly if you are hiking and have to keep weight to a minimum. Listed below is a recommended list of stuff to take with you in general, as well as a recommended list for trekking.

Kit List for General Rucksack

– Passport (with photocopies)
– Travel insurance and list of any allergies or medical conditions (with photocopies)
– Airline tickets (with photocopies)
– USD cash (or Soles)
– Credit or debit card
– Any entry visas or vaccination certificates required
– Camera and film
– Reading/writing material
– Cover for backpacks
– Pocketknife
– 2 fleece tops
– Windproof/waterproof jacket
– Travel towel and swim wear
– 4 shirts/t-shirts
– Sun hat (very important!)
– 1 pair of shorts
– 2 pairs of long trousers
– 1 pair of pjamas
– Hiking boots/ sturdy walking shoes
– Sport sandals
– Sunblock
– Sunglasses
– Toiletries (biodegradable)
– Watch or alarm clock
– Water bottle
– Purification tablets or filter
– Flashlight
– Buff
– First-aid kit (should contain lip salve, Aspirin, Band Aids, anti-histamine, Imodium or similar tablets for mild cases of diarrhea, re-hydration powder, extra prescription drugs you may be taking)

When packing for trekking, weight and usefulness are key. Make sure you pack items that will be durable and last for multiple days of trekking, i.e. merino wool, hiking trousers over jeans, etc.

Trekking Pack List

– Inner sheet (for sleeping bag – make sure you choose a fleece or silk one for extra warmth!)
– Wool hat, mitts or gloves (preferably waterproof – these will be essential in the evening at high altitude)
– Raincoat
– Dry sack to keep gear dry
– Sleeping bag
– Self-inflating or foam mattress (essential for keeping the cold and sharp rocks from disturbing your sleep)
– First-aid kit
– Thermal underwear/pajamas
– 2-4 hiking tops (choose a mixture of loose-fitting short and long-sleeved options; the bugs are fierce in the rainforest and their bites will make you bleed)
– 1-2 hiking trousers
– Swimsuit
– Camera
– Reading material
– Snacks
– Water
– Walking pole (very useful when walking across landslide sections, or steep parts of the trail where the terrain is mostly scree)
– Sunglasses
– 2 pairs of socks
– A good sports bra
– Rain cover for bag

Do you have any suggestions? List them below!

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#take12trips challenge: The Salkantay Trail, Peru: the Alternative Inca Trail

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First and foremost, choosing our big #take12trips challenge was easy; Peru has Macchu Picchu, varied scenery and some of the best food in the world. Choosing how to get to Macchu Picchu however was more difficult. For ages we thought the only way of reaching Macchu Picchu was through the Inca Trail or by train, but after speaking with the good folk at G Adventures we were all on board with the Salkantay Trek.

Unlike the Inca Trail, the Salkantay is a high-altitude trek that takes in varied scenery through the Salkantay mountain pass and down through the Amazon Rainforest. The trail gives trekkers the opportunity to do lots of side trips in between the main trek, which we took ample opportunity to do.

Salkantay sunshine 2 Continue reading

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#take12trips challenge: Peru’s Other Incan Sites

 

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Peru is undoubtedly famous for its Incan site, Macchu Picchu, and the Inca Trail that takes visitors there. However, there are a wealth of sites just outside of Macchu Peru in Cusco, that are well worth a visit with fewer crowds.  Continue reading

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#take12trips challenge: The Great British Summer at Etherley Farm

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Many people complain about the British weather, and sure, the grey skies and frequent bouts of rain can be a downer, but when the sun shines there’s no better place to be than outside exploring the countryside. With the forecast predicting sunshine all weekend myself, John, Rob and Emma all loaded the ciders and smores and headed to Etherley Farm in the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

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The Best Sun Hat for Outdoor Adventures and Trips

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Finding a summer hat that simultaneously protects your face from the UV rays whilst looking good is like striking gold. Most high street options are flimsy and crumble against the elements. Of course, there is always those crisp white hats your grandparents wear, but sacrificing over £70 and the knowledge that you will resemble an antiquated BBC documentary host are factors few people are willing to accept.

So when Tarp Hats got in contact with me about testing one of their namesakes, one quick look and read made me confident I had hit the jackpot (in vogue sun protection, anyway).

But first: what is a Tarp Hat I hear you ask?

Way back when trucks were the primary use of goods transport in the Amazon, tarpaulins were used to cover and protect the trucks and goods. Over the years the tarpaulins became worn from the elements and were discarded in the remote villages in Brazil.

Tarp Hats are constructed by the local villagers in Brazil using the discard tarpaulins and giving them a new lease of life. Each hat is waterproofed to protect against increment weather and brass eyelets are used to prevent rusting.

These are pretty big claims for what looks like an incongruous hat, and so I decided I really wanted to put it through its paces, starting with a little jaunt over the Malverns.

The first trip was an initial test to see how it would cope with a general summer day’s hike the average joe would take. What started as a harmless walk through fields of wildflowers……

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……escalated quickly into a tiring 20+ mile hike through all the Malverns on a blustery day, to the summit of Great Malvern.

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Luckily the Tarp Hat pulled through, only blowing off twice against the fierce wind and the brim proved wide enough to protect my face from sunburn. On a side note ladies, it also gave me much less hat hair than any other hat I have tried in the past. Sure, it’s not the most important thing when outdoors, but every little helps, right?

So overall, the Tarp Hat could easily handle what the Malverns threw at it. However, the Malverns were going to look like a walk to the shops compared to the next test I put the Tarp Hat through: a long-distance hike through Scotland.

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Rain and sun, beaches, storms and their gales of wind, not to mention the surprisingly endless summer hours of blistering heat trudging up and down pine forests and hills, the Tarp Hat performed well throughout all the elements, and then some.

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Of course, I then decided to test the Tarp Hat through even harsher, more varied terrain: the Salkantay mountain pass to Macchu Picchu. Frosty mountains, rainforests, scorching days spent traversing desert hills and roads, the Tarp Hat proved to be in its element, whatever the elements.

Salkantay Pass Jump

Inca Slide

After all the adventures we have been on together these past few months, it’s fair to say the Tarp Hat has become another trusty edition to my essential kit list for the outdoors. In fact, it hasn’t just been popular with me alone – countless other hikers, guides and friends have tried it or expressed interest in the Tarp Hat, proving it makes friends wherever it goes.

It is not only the fit and the durability of the Tarp Hat that makes me like it so much, but also the company itself. The hats are produced by the local villagers using materials that would have otherwise been littered in the Amazon, thus giving jobs to a remote region and creating treasures from trash. In addition to this, 50p of every hat purchased goes towards installing freshwater wells to remote villages in the Brazilian Amazonian rainforest. The video below shows one of the typical villages in the Amazon that is helped by Tarp Hats.

It is rare that I find myself so enthusiastic about products, but Tarp Hat’s ability to combine a simple, good idea with eco-friendliness and sustainable, social practices can only make me like it further.

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#take12trips challenge, The Speyside Way: Boat of Garten to Aviemore

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After seeing the Cairngorms peeking at us from the horizon the day before, we were eager to reach the end of The Speyside Way and begin on our next adventure: exploring the Cairngorm National Park. And so, the early morning light found us briskly walking through the residential part of Boat of Garten and towards Aviemore, the last stop of the trail. Continue reading

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#take12trips challenge, The Speyside Way: Grantown-on-Spey to Boat of Garten

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When deciding how to divide up the different walking sections of The Speyside Way, the trail between Grantown-on-Spey and the Boat of Garten left us perplexed.  Unlike the previous days’ sections, this portion was flat and straightforward, and as a result many people had combined it with the last section to Aviemore, the end of the trail and only an additional six miles. Given that we had walked 25 miles in the past two days though, we decided our legs had probably earned a rest day and decided to only do the 11 miles to Boat of Garten.

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#take12trips challenge, The Speyside Way: Ballindalloch to Grantown-on-Spey

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After a heavy session of hiking the day before, our eyes and limbs were reluctant to recognise the morning light coming through our window. This unwillingness was further exacerbated when we remembered that today was the most difficult section of the Speyside Way: 13 miles of hillwalking in the searing heat. However the rumbling sounds of trucks from the Cragganmore distillery next door soon alerted us to rise and shine. Continue reading

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#take12trips challenge, The Speyside Way, Craigellachie to Ballindalloch

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The next section of The Speyside Way, from Craigellachie to Ballindalloch, was a long, fairly straight stretch of 12 miles that followed the old railway route. In fact, throughout most of it, the old station platforms, railway arches and even remnants of discarded railway machinery remained, yet to be claimed by nature.  Continue reading

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#take12trips challenge The Speyside Way, Scotland: Whisky Touring!

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Just like the Speyside region, whisky is a pretty big deal in our household. We hold regular whisky nights, it’s become the de facto gift people give us for holidays, and our table has become so overrun with whisky bottles that one of my writing desks drawers has become a mini whisky cabinet. So the opportunity to see how one of our favourite drinks is made, and explore it in the gorgeous landscape of Scotland no less, gave us the impetus to rise early and make our first stop of the day: the Macallan Distillery. Continue reading

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