Tag Archives: trekking

Walking Some of the Peak District’s Highlights in a Weekend with the National Trust

Peak_District1 (39)

When searching for inspiration for weekend hikes, I frequently use the National Trust website. More than just country manors (although it is as easy to get lost in one of those houses as it is outdoors, am I right?) the National Trust website offers loads of walking route ideas ranging in length and ability, and are particularly good for those with little hikers to entertain! Recently I completed one of the National Trust’s more challenging hikes, created in association with Cotswold Outdoor. Located in the Peak District and covering some of the national park’s biggest highlights, adept hikers can enjoy dramatic ridge walks, some light scrambling, and of course fun times clambering over some of the Peak District’s famous quirky rock formations!
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Walking New Zealand’s Kepler Track: Day One

Kepler-Track-Day1-track

Hiking on one of New Zealand’s Great Walks is a rite of passage for all visitors to this amazing country. With dramatic mountain scenery, unique wildlife and the well-organised hut and camping system, it’s easy to see why hikers worldwide flock to New Zealand’s Great Walks. Not gonna lie, it was difficult deciding on only one Great Walk to do in New Zealand. Given the amount of time we had to spend in the country, not to mention how far in advance it took to book sleeping space in the mountain huts, we decided to avoid the beautiful but popular Milford Track and instead opted for the Kepler Track. What followed was three days of otherworldly landscapes, close encounters with endangered species not found anywhere else in the world, and of course a diet mostly consisting of pasta, granola bars and chocolate.

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Weekend Walks from London: Grand Union Canal Trail

Only 40 minutes away by train from London lies the Grand Union Canal Walk, a trail that incorporates picturesque English landscapes, weird and wonderful canal boats and more pubs than you can shake a pint at along the route.

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What to Pack for Hiking in Peru

salkantay trail feature

With its varied terrain and altitude, Peru can be very difficult to pack for, particularly if you are hiking and have to keep weight to a minimum. Listed below is a recommended list of stuff to take with you in general, as well as a recommended list for trekking.

Kit List for General Rucksack

– Passport (with photocopies)
– Travel insurance and list of any allergies or medical conditions (with photocopies)
– Airline tickets (with photocopies)
– USD cash (or Soles)
– Credit or debit card
– Any entry visas or vaccination certificates required
– Camera and film
– Reading/writing material
– Cover for backpacks
– Pocketknife
– 2 fleece tops
– Windproof/waterproof jacket
– Travel towel and swim wear
– 4 shirts/t-shirts
– Sun hat (very important!)
– 1 pair of shorts
– 2 pairs of long trousers
– 1 pair of pjamas
– Hiking boots/ sturdy walking shoes
– Sport sandals
– Sunblock
– Sunglasses
– Toiletries (biodegradable)
– Watch or alarm clock
– Water bottle
– Purification tablets or filter
– Flashlight
– Buff
– First-aid kit (should contain lip salve, Aspirin, Band Aids, anti-histamine, Imodium or similar tablets for mild cases of diarrhea, re-hydration powder, extra prescription drugs you may be taking)

When packing for trekking, weight and usefulness are key. Make sure you pack items that will be durable and last for multiple days of trekking, i.e. merino wool, hiking trousers over jeans, etc.

Trekking Pack List

– Inner sheet (for sleeping bag – make sure you choose a fleece or silk one for extra warmth!)
– Wool hat, mitts or gloves (preferably waterproof – these will be essential in the evening at high altitude)
– Raincoat
– Dry sack to keep gear dry
– Sleeping bag
– Self-inflating or foam mattress (essential for keeping the cold and sharp rocks from disturbing your sleep)
– First-aid kit
– Thermal underwear/pajamas
– 2-4 hiking tops (choose a mixture of loose-fitting short and long-sleeved options; the bugs are fierce in the rainforest and their bites will make you bleed)
– 1-2 hiking trousers
– Swimsuit
– Camera
– Reading material
– Snacks
– Water
– Walking pole (very useful when walking across landslide sections, or steep parts of the trail where the terrain is mostly scree)
– Sunglasses
– 2 pairs of socks
– A good sports bra
– Rain cover for bag

Do you have any suggestions? List them below!

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#take12trips challenge: The Salkantay Trail, Peru: the Alternative Inca Trail

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First and foremost, choosing our big #take12trips challenge was easy; Peru has Macchu Picchu, varied scenery and some of the best food in the world. Choosing how to get to Macchu Picchu however was more difficult. For ages we thought the only way of reaching Macchu Picchu was through the Inca Trail or by train, but after speaking with the good folk at G Adventures we were all on board with the Salkantay Trek.

Unlike the Inca Trail, the Salkantay is a high-altitude trek that takes in varied scenery through the Salkantay mountain pass and down through the Amazon Rainforest. The trail gives trekkers the opportunity to do lots of side trips in between the main trek, which we took ample opportunity to do.

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How to Really Help Nepal

Annapurna Nepal River

With the endless images of collapsed buildings, reports of lost heritage sites and the varying statistics and numbers of lives lost, injured or missing, it can be difficult to compute, and easy to feel unable to help those in Nepal from thousands of miles away. And with the various aftershocks hitting the country, it looks like things are only going to get worse before they get better. Continue reading

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#Take12Trips Challenge, Trip One: The Cotswold Way and Heart of England

 

After spending Saturday night filling up on excellent wine and generous portions of steak and triple-cooked chips and dark chocolate and salted caramel cake at The Bell Inn in nearby Willersey, we awoke slightly groggy, in need of a good breakfast and long walk to revive us. In what I liked to think was a stroke of good planning but more likely luck, the Cotswold Way ran right past our hotel, and was our route of choice for the day. This national trail, running for approximately 100 miles between Bath and Chipping Campden, takes in the Cotswolds’ most postcard-perfect villages and landscape, and so we eagerly wolfed down bacon sandwiches and started on the trail.

cotswold-way-sign

 

In another stroke of good fortune, the weather was cool and misty, a small respite against hiking up hills with hangover sweats. After slipping and sliding our way up Fish Hill, we sped past Tillbury Hollow, normally an excellent picnic site in good weather, and continued onwards.

The terrain was invariably flat farmland on this portion of the Cotswold Way, but with those dry stone walls iconic to the Cotswold region lining the walk and a random abandoned Cotswold cottage thrown in for good measure, the walk had a romantic, ‘old English’ feel you would expect.

Eventually we reached Dover’s Hill, home of the original English Olympic Games and the rather painful sport of ‘shin-kicking’ (I don’t understand it either). The National Trust spot is a natural amphitheatre with a Roman vineyard nestled away in its landscape, making it an ideal spot to rest.

 

dovers-hill-color

 

dovers-hill-antique

 

But not for too long, as Chipping Campden is only a mile or so away, and arguably the quaintest of all the Cotswold villages we had seen so far.

 

chipping-campden-high-street

 

Having reached Chipping Campden in breakneck speed, we decided that four miles wasn’t enough hiking, and with the day still early trotted off to the tourist information board for recommendations of nearby hikes.

It was quite good we did really, as otherwise we would not have discovered what was one of the most beautiful walks I’ve ever taken in southern England: The Heart of England Way.

 

heart-of-england-trail

 

heart-of-england-house

 

Measuring 100 miles in distance, the Heart of England Way links the Cannock Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, in Staffordshire, with the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, in Gloucestershire, and a healthy amount of mileage in rural Warwickshire thrown in for good measure. Encompassing remote English villages off the track of the main Cotswold Way, to dramatic hillscapes and historic monuments, the Heart of England Way is an excellent choice for hikers wanting a varied scenery, or lots of stopping points for food and drink.

 

broad-campden-cottage

 

We embarked on the eight-mile stretch of the trail between Chipping Campden and Moreton-in-Marsh, stopping in Blockley to refuel. Almost immediately on the trail, we were led through achingly beautiful English hamlets and gently rolling hillsides. The small village of Broad Campden in particular was so serene and picturesque I had to stop for a few minutes and appreciate the view. With its thatched-roof cottages, regal manor house and fields dotted with flocks of grazing sheep, it so perfectly encompassed the Cotswold stereotype I had expected on our trip.

 

broad-campden-church

 

 

 

broad-campden-house

 

The scenery only improved the further we journeyed on the trail. Woodland and farm fields gradually changed into small villages, and in the hilly village of Blockley the lovely folk at the adorable Blockley Village Shop and Cafe gladly refilled our water bottles for us.

 

heart-of-england-trail-house

 

Our journey continued on through more forests and villages, until we reached our final destination, Moreton-in-Marsh, managing to catch the train with two minutes to spare!

Breakdown of our weekend in the Cotswolds:

Return train tickets from London Paddington to Moreton-in-Marsh for two: £52.00

Bus fare to Broadway for two: £6.20

Two nights, including breakfast, at the Farncombe Conference Centre in a double superior room: £115.00

Total: £173.20

If you are interested in trying the walks out for yourself, we used the Pathfinder Guides’ The Cotswolds Walks for our first hike to Broadway Tower, and the National Trails‘ website for information on The Cotswold Way. For the Heart of England Way, it is listed on the Ordnance Survey EXPLORER maps, but is also clearly signposted on the route. Otherwise, The Heart of England Way guidebook is available on its website. PLEASE NOTE, the Heart of England Way does NOT pass through Moreton-in-Marsh, it ends in Bourton-on-the-Hill. To follow our route, follow the signposts for the Heart of England until just after Blockley, then follow signage for The Monarch’s Way.

Have you done any of these trails? Tell me about your experiences below! 

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BMS Releases Winter Skills Help Videos

 

 

The helpful people at BMC sent their latest project into my inbox today: a nine-part series of winter skills videos to help everyone make the most of the outdoors in the winter months, in association with the Association of Mountain Instructors, Lowe Alpine and DMM.

Here is what they had to say:

The hills in their snowy winter garb are beautiful and exciting, but they also pose hazards you don’t have to contend with in more clement conditions.

So how do you deal with sub-zero temperatures, slopes of hard névé, cornices, avalanche hazards or whiteouts? There is no substitute for having skills and knowledge imparted face-to-face by an experienced instructor.

But we all need a refresher from time to time, so to help you reinforce your skills we have teamed up with the Association of Mountain Instructors (AMI)Lowe Alpine and DMM to produce this new series of instructional winter videos.

Filmed in harsh winter conditions at Glenmore Lodge, they feature AMI instructors taking you through a raft of winter basics, from matching up boots and crampons to being aware of avalanche hazard on the hills.

Watch, learn, and above all, have fun!

Given the accidents up in the Lake District in previous months, now it is more important than ever to learn more about winter skills, to potentially save your life and others. The BMC do an amazing amount of work

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Things to Consider When Choosing your Macchu Picchu Trek

 

Photo credit: justin_vidamo / Foter / CC BY

Easily one of the most popular destinations in the world, Macchu Picchu is one of those once-in-a-lifetime trips. So when choosing how to get there, obviously it is important to choose the right trek that will meet your expectations and time-frame (not to mention your hard-earned cash). However the different treks, especially when combined with add-ons and other excursions can be bewildering to say the least, and overwhelming at most.

After visiting the Destinations Travel Show the other week and speaking to countless tour operators, I have put together a helpful overview of the three most popular trekking options to help you decide which is best for you.

Inca Trail: Easily the most popular route to Macchu Picchu, it also means there is an approximately six-month waiting list to get a permit. Book well in advance if you desperately want to go on this trek, particularly between the high season of June to August, or you will wind up disappointed.

With a maximum of 500 permits a day allowed on the Inca trail, it is the busiest trail to Macchu Picchu. Many tour operators claim tour groups leave in a staggered rota in the morning so the trail is not too clogged with people. Regardless, with 500 people on it at any one time, you’re bound to see some groups on the way, and if the idea of potentially sharing the trail with several tour groups leaves you feeling irritable, then perhaps a quieter option is best. On the other hand, if you enjoy the camaraderie of meeting new people on your travels, then this might be the one for you.

The Inca Trail is supposedly the trail with the most archaeology to see, but is also the most touristy. In addition to this, because it is the most popular trek, it is generally cheaper than the other options.

Salkantay Trek: If you are looking for a challenge, then the Salkantay trek is for you. Following a high-altitude trail that passes by the Peruvian Andes, and in particular the impressive Salkantay peak, this trek is a good choice for those wanting breath-taking scenery. Permits are not required for this trek luckily, and as it demands a certain level of fitness, it is also the most quiet. Speaking of fitness, this is a fairly demanding trek that requires an excellent level of fitness – good for those with time to train, not for those wanting a last-minute trek to Macchu Picchu.

The trail goes through the ‘back-door’ of Macchu Picchu, through Santa Teresa and ending at Aguas Calientes. There, you have the option of either walking the last kilometre to Macchu Picchu or getting the train. Whichever you choose, just make sure you arrive early!

Lares Trek: For those wanting a glimpse of traditional rural life in Peru, then this is the ideal trek. The Lares trail goes through remote mountain communities that still retain a strong sense of local culture. As it is a slightly shorter trek (three days) and does not require a permit, the Lares Trek is a good option for those short on time, booking a last-minute trip, or wanting squeeze in a trek while backpacking through South America.

Similar to the Salkantay Trek, it also ends in Aguas Calientes, with the option of the train or hike up to Macchu Picchu.

 

Which trek have you gone on, and what made you choose it?

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Exploring the Tranquillity of Lake Bohinj and Slavica Waterfall

Upon seeing Lake Bohinj (pronounced baw-heen), Agatha Christie once famously said that it was far too beautiful for a murder.

This might not sound like high praise to us, but admittedly Agatha Christie was on to something.

Take a visit at any time to Lake Bled, or mention the two lakes to Slovenians, and the age-old debate will ignite over which one is more beautiful. Admittedly, Lake Bohinj does not have the fairytale charm of Lake Bled, with its cliff-top castle and island churches in the lake, but instead it possesses a more natural, peaceful beauty that is breathtaking in its own right.

I guess the best way to compare is to see Lake Bohinj for yourself.

 

lake bohinj

 

Lake-Bohinj

 

In the summer, the area is awash with swimmers, canoes, kayaks and standup paddleboarders, but come the end of high season, and the area is free to explore in relative peace and quiet.

 

kayaking-bohinj

 

Hiking trails and winding roads abound in the area, making it relatively simple for travellers to explore the region’s natural sites. Undoubtedly the hike to Savica waterfall is one of Lake Bohinj’s most popular trails. After getting dropped off by the bus stop on the western side of Lake Bohinj, follow the number three hiking trail signs for Ukanc to Savica. The trail is a long, white pebbly trail totalling one hour, 20 minutes walking time in total, and takes in several quaint villages and natural forests in the region.

Warning: Walking on this trail may give you cabin fever (the kind that makes you want to pack-up and move into a quaint log house in the mountains, not the other kind).

 Bohinj cottage

 

Bohinj capital sign

 

Driving to Savica waterfall, or even walking along the road, is equally scenic, and offers several surprises along the road.

 

slavica forest

Bohinj tree boulder

 

Lake Bohinj, and the surrounding area, was once an important stop-gap along the way to the Isonzo Front in WWI. Railway stations and trains were constructed by POWs to allow the Austrians to stop for supplies before continuing their journey to the Isonzo Front. Today remains of this history, including a WWI POW cemetery, and pieces of the disused railway, can be found in pockets of the forest along the side of the road, and parts are still being recovered. As recently as 2010 more than 130 unexploded WWI mines were found in the bottom Lake Bohinj, after an Austrian train derailed and drove into the lake – the train remains in there today!

 

Bohinj WWI cemetery

 

Not to worry though, as Lake Bohinj continues to be a safe place to swim.

 

Both trail and road eventually lead to the Savica hut, with the waterfall a 20–minute walk up a mere 500 steps from that point – make sure to wear comfortable shoes! Cutting into a gorge 60m below, it’s turquoise waters originate from melted glaciers high in the mountains, and heavy rains in the area.

slavica waterfall

 

slavica-waterfall

The beauty of Savica waterfall has inspired numerous writers, royal and governmental officials, and historical figures from Slovenian history, but none more so than Slovenian Romantic poet France Prešeren. Upon witnessing Savica falls, Preseren used it as the setting in  his epic, Baptism on the Savica, describing it as:

The falls next morning thunder in his ears.

Our hero ponders as the lazy waters

Below him roar and shake the river banks.

Above him towering cliffs and mountain heights,

These with their trees the river undermines,

As in its wrath its foam flies to the skies!

So hastens youth and then it spends itself,

Thus Črtomir reflects upon this scene.

Likewise, Slovenian priest and national poet Valentin Vodnik described Savica Waterfall in several of his writings, the most popular being:

I march to drink the Savica

The cold source of enchanting songs;

To toast the master of songsters

May I enjoy in this drink!

 

During the low season the Savica waterfall is fairly tame, but come spring and visitors will be soaked by the spray from the sheer amount of water thundering from its mouth.

At the end of the long hike back to Lake Bohinj, relax and dip your hot feet into the lake’s cool waters. Be warned though, the water is really cold come low season!

kiki-bohinj

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